Steve Flynn  RE/MAX Crest Realty- Burnaby 

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After growing in February and March to a record level, Canadian employment was little changed in April at 19,601k. The labour market is tight, with the Canadian unemployment rate declining by 0.1 to 5.2 per cent, the lowest rate on record since comparable data became available in 1976. The total hours worked fell 1.9 per cent in April while average hourly wages were up 3.3 per cent on a year-over-year basis, similar to March and February. Wage gains are below the inflation rate, however, which clocked in at 6.7 per cent year-over-year in the most-recent data. The employment rate held steady at 61.9 per cent.

Employment in BC was largely unchanged in April at 2,736k. Metro Vancouver's employment growth was also largely flat at -0.2 per cent month over month. The unemployment rate rose in April for a second month in a row, reaching 5.4 per cent and surpassing Canada's rate for the first time since mid-2020. 


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The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver* is currently $1,374,500. This represents a 1% increase from March 2022 and a a 18.9% increase from April 2021.


Specifically:

- The benchmark price for detached homes increased 1% from Mar 2022 and increased 20.8% from Apr 2021.

- The benchmark price for townhouses increased 1.1% from Mar 2022 and increased 25% from Apr 2021.

- The benchmark price for apartment/condos increased 1.1% from Mar 2022 and increased 16% from Apr 2021.


Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



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Home buyer demand in Metro Vancouver* returned to more historically typical levels in April:


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 3,232 in April 2022, a 34.1 per cent decrease from the 4,908 sales recorded in April 2021, and a 25.6 per cent decrease from the 4,344 homes sold in March 2022. 
Last month’s sales were 1.5 per cent above the 10-year April sales average.


“So far this spring, we’ve seen home sales ease down from the record-breaking pace of the last year,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “While a small sample size, the return to a more traditional pace of home sales that we’ve experienced over the last two months provides hopeful home buyers more time to make decisions, secure financing and perform other due diligence such as home inspections.”


There were 6,107 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in April 2022. This represents a 23.1 per cent decrease compared to the 7,938 homes listed in April 2021 and an 8.5 per cent decrease compared to March 2022 when 6,673 homes were listed.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 8,796, a 14.1 per cent decrease compared to April 2021 (10,245) and a 15.3 per cent increase compared to March 2022 (7,628). “With interest rates climbing and the total inventory of homes for sale inching higher, it’s important to work with your local Realtor to understand how these factors could affect your home buying or selling situation,” John said. 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for April 2022 is 36.7 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 25.3 per cent for detached homes, 47.1 per cent for townhomes, and 45 per cent for apartments. Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,374,500. This represents an 18.9 per cent increase over April 2021 and a one per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Sales of detached homes in April 2022 reached 962, a 41.9 per cent decrease from the 1,655 detached sales recorded in April 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,139,200. This represents a 20.8 per cent increase from April 2021 and a one per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,692 in April 2022, a 26.1 per cent decrease compared to the 2,289 sales in April 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $844,700. This represents a 16 per cent increase from April 2021 and a 1.1 per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Attached home sales in April 2022 totalled 578, a 40 per cent decrease compared to the 964 sales in April 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,150,500. This represents a 25 per cent increase from April 2021 and a 1.1 per cent increase compared to March 2022.



Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



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The Canadian economy jumped 1.1 per cent in February, up for the ninth consecutive month. Goods-producing sectors rose 1.5 per cent while services-producing industries were up 0.9 per cent. Canadian real GDP is roughly 1.5 per cent above its pre-pandemic, February 2020 level. Preliminary estimates suggest that output in the Canadian economy grew 0.5 per cent in March.

With a a very high figure for February and strong preliminary numbers continuing into March, the Canadian economy appears to be on a strong growth path as it emerges from the Omicron-related slowdown. The Bank of Canada has noted that the slack in the Canadian economy is largely absorbed, which is partly why it has hiked rates from 0.25 in March to 1 per cent currently. Amid strong GDP growth and high inflation, the expectation is that the bank will again raise rates at its upcoming June 1st announcement by another 0.5 per cent. BCREA forecasts that the bank will continue raising rates until the overnight policy rate reaches 1.75 per cent, the level which prevailed prior to the COVID-19 crisis.


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Canadian prices, as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), rose 6.7% on a year-over-year basis in March, up from 5.7% in February. This was the largest gain since January 1991 (+6.7%). According to Statistics Canada, price rises were broad-based, with groceries up 8.7% year over year, gasoline up 39.8%, durable goods up 7.3%, restaurants up 5.4%, and shelter costs up 6.8%. Excluding gasoline, the CPI rose 5.5% year over year in March. On a monthly basis, prices were up 1.4%, following an increase of 1% in February. In BC, consumer prices rose 6.0% year-over-year. 

With inflation stubbornly high through the first quarter of the year and unemployment in Canada hitting a record low, the Bank of Canada is now planning to bring its policy rate back to a neutral level, between 1.75 and 2.75 per cent, much faster than previously anticipated. We expect the Bank will continue to tighten until there is clear evidence that inflation and inflation expectations are moderating back to normal levels. This more aggressive policy stance has already been priced into 5-year fixed mortgage rates, which are now on a path to surpassing 4 per cent for the first time in a decade.


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Canadian housing starts fell by 4.0k (-1.6%) to 246.2k units in March at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate (SAAR). Comparing year-over-year, starts were down from March of 2021 (-25.4% y/y). Single-detached housing starts rose 7.1% to 83.9k, while multi-family and others declined 5.6% to 162.3k (SAAR). 

In British Columbia, starts were down 6.7% in March, falling to 32.6k units SAAR in all areas of the province. In areas in the province with 10,000 or more residents, single-detached starts rose 4.7% m/m to 8.1k units while multi-family starts declined 11.7% to 20.6k units. Starts in the province were 54.1% below the levels from March 2021. Starts were down by 2.9k units in Vancouver, 3.6k in Victoria, and 0.4k in Abbotsford, but rose 1.5k in Kelowna from last month. The 6-month moving average trend declined 1.5% to 39.6k in BC in March. 


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The Bank of Canada raised its overnight policy rate by 0.5 per cent to 1 per cent. This was the first rate increase of more than 0.25 per cent since May 2000. The Bank will also begin so called "quantitative tightening" , meaning it will be shrinking its balance sheet over time, reversing the expansion that occurred in response to the pandemic.  In the statement accompanying the decision, the Bank noted that growth in Canada is strong and the economy is moving into a phase of excess demand with tight labour markets and significant pressure on consumer prices.


The Bank expects the Canadian economy will grow 4.25 per cent this year before slowing to 3.25 per cent next year.  On inflation, the Bank anticipates inflation will gradually decline from its current 6 per cent rate to 2.5 per cent by the second half of 2023.  Finally, the Bank signalled that interest rates will need to rise further and that the timing and and pace of future increases will be guided by the Banks ongoing assessment of the economy.

With inflation stubbornly high through the first quarter of the year, exacerbated by the impact of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and unemployment in Canada hitting a record low, the Bank has opted for a more aggressive stance.  Clearly the Bank is now planning to bring its policy rate back to a neutral level, between 1.75 and 2.75 per cent, much faster than previously anticipated. We expect the Bank will continue to tighten until there is clear evidence that inflation and inflation expectations are moderating back to normal levels. This more aggressive policy stance has already been priced into 5-year fixed mortgage rates, which are now on a path to surpassing 4 per cent for the first time in a decade.



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The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 11,463 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in March 2022, a decrease of 24.1 per cent from a record March 2021.


The average MLS® residential price in BC was $1.096 million, a 15.7 per cent increase from $946,813 recorded in March 2021. Total sales dollar volume was $12.6 billion, a 12.1 per cent decline from the same time last year.


“Home sales in the province continue to moderate from record highs of this time last year,” said BCREA Chief Economist Brendon Ogmundson. “Given the sharp rise in Canadian mortgage rates and expected tightening from the Bank of Canada, activity will likely slow further in the second half of this year.”
 
Provincial active listings were 12.4 per cent lower than this time last year with the total inventory of homes for sale in the province at under 20,000 units. That level of inventory remains well below the roughly 40,000 listings needed for a balanced market.  
 
Year-to-date, BC residential sales dollar volume was down 4.1 per cent to $28.8 billion, compared with the same period in 2021. Residential unit sales were down 20.1 per cent to 26,577 units, while the average MLS® residential price was up 20 per cent to $1.086 million. 


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I have sold a property at 38 21960 RIVER RD in Maple Ridge.
Don’t miss out on this beautiful 3 bed 2 bath townhome within steps of the Westcoast Express. This home has updates throughout, featuring barn doors, custom mud room, ship lap wall features, modern kitchen with stainless steel appliances and white subway tile backsplash, a huge patio, and one of the nicest garages you will ever see!!! This townhouse needs to be viewed to be truly appreciated!
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Canadian employment rose by 73,000 (+0.4%) in March hitting a fresh record for employment, according to Statistics Canada. The labour market is increasingly tight, with the Canadian unemployment rate declining to 5.3%, the lowest rate on record since comparable data became available in 1976. The total hours worked rose 1.3% in March while average hourly wages were up 3.4% on a year-over-year basis, up from 3.1% in February. Wage gains are below the inflation rate, however, which clocked in at 5.7% year-over-year in February.

Public health measures continued to ease prior to the survey reference week in March, driving labour market gains. Employment growth occurred in both the services-producing (+42,000; +0.3%) and the goods-producing (+31,000; +0.8%) sectors in March. The labour force participation rate was essentially unchanged at 65%.

BC's labour market continues to moderately outperform Canada's, with employment rising by 10,500 (0.4%) in March. Metro Vancouver's employment growth once again outpaced the province, with employment rising 9,300 (0.6%). Seasonally-adjusted employment in BC is not only above pre-pandemic levels, but hit a record high for a 6th consecutive month. The unemployment rate ticked upwards slightly in March, reaching 5.1%. Among the provinces, only Quebec and Saskatchewan have lower unemployment rates. 


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While down from last year’s record numbers, home sale activity in Metro Vancouver’s* housing market remained elevated in March:


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 4,344 in March 2022, a 23.9 per cent decrease from the 5,708 sales recorded in March 2021, and a 26.9 per cent increase from the 3,424 homes sold in February 2022. 
Last month’s sales were 25.5 per cent above the 10-year March sales average. 


“March of 2021 was the highest selling month in our history. This year’s activity, while still elevated, is happening at a calmer pace than we experienced 12 months ago,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “Home buyers are keeping a close eye on rising interest rates, hoping to make a move before their locked-in rates expire.” 


There were 6,673 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in March 2022. This represents a 19.5 per cent decrease compared to the 8,287 homes listed in March 2021 and a 22 per cent increase compared to February 2022 when 5,471 homes were listed.

 
The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 7,628, a 16.6 per cent decrease compared to March 2021 (9,145) and a 13.1 per cent increase compared to February 2022 (6,742). 
“We’re still seeing upward pressure on prices across all housing categories in the region. Lack of supply is driving this pressure,” John said. “The number of homes listed for sale on our MLS® system today is less than half of what’s needed to shift the market into balanced territory.” 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for March 2022 is 56.9 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 38.8 per cent for detached homes, 73.3 per cent for townhomes, and 70.3 per cent for apartments. 
Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,360,500. This represents a 20.7 per cent increase over March 2021 and a 3.6 per cent increase compared to February 2022. 


Sales of detached homes in March 2022 reached 1,291, a 34.3 per cent decrease from the 1,965 detached sales recorded in March 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,118,600. This represents a 23.4 per cent increase from March 2021 and a 3.6 per cent increase compared to February 2022. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 2,310 in March 2022, a 14.3 per cent decrease compared to the 2,697 sales in March 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $835,500. This represents a 16.8 per cent increase from March 2021 and a 3.4 per cent increase compared to February 2022. 


Attached home sales in March 2022 totalled 743, a 29.0 per cent decrease compared to the 1,046 sales in March 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,138,300. This represents a 28.1 per cent increase from March 2021 and a 4.4 per cent increase compared to February 2022.



Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



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The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver* is currently $1,360,500. This represents a 3.6% increase from February 2022 and a a 20.7% increase from March 2021.


Specifically:

- The benchmark price for detached homes increased 3.6% from Feb 2022 and increased 23.4% from Mar 2021.

- The benchmark price for townhouses increased 4.4% from Feb 2022 and increased 28.1% from Mar 2021.

- The benchmark price for apartment/condos increased 3.4% from Feb 2022 and increased 16.8% from Mar 2021.


Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



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The Canadian economy rose 0.2% in January, up for the eighth consecutive month. Goods-producing sectors rose 0.8% while services-producing industries remained flat on Omicron-related restrictions. Canadian real GDP is roughly 0.4 per cent above its pre-pandemic, February 2020 level. Preliminary estimates suggest that output in the Canadian economy grew 0.8% in February.

With a high preliminary estimate for February, the Canadian economy appears to be on a strong growth path as it emerges from the Omicron-related slowdown. The Bank of Canada has noted that the slack in the Canadian economy is largely absorbed, which is partly why it hiked rates from 0.25% to 0.5% in early March. Amid strong GDP growth and high inflation, the expectation is that the bank will again raise rates at its upcoming announcement on April 13th by another 0.25% or even 0.5%. BCREA forecasts that the bank will continue raising rates until the overnight policy rate reaches 1.75 per cent, the level which prevailed prior to the COVID-19 crisis.



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Canadian seasonally-adjusted retail sales rose 3.2% to $58.9 billion in January. The increase was driven by a rebound in sales at motor vehicle and parts dealers (+5.3%) and new car dealers (+5.5%). Sales rose in 9 of 11 subsectors of the economy. Core retail sales, which strips out gasoline and vehicle and parts sales, increased 2.9% in January. In volume terms, sales were up 2.9%. 

In BC, seasonally-adjusted sales rose 4% in January. Compared to the same month last year, retail sales were up 2.1% in the province. In the Greater Vancouver region, sales rose 5.4% month-over-month and were up 11% year-over-year. 

In January, Canadian e-commerce sales declined 28% to 3.2 billion. As a result, e-commerce decreased from 6.9% of total retail sales in December to 6.3% in January. This percentage remains elevated relative to pre-pandemic levels.



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Canadian prices, as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), rose 5.7% on a year-over-year basis in February, up from 5.1% in January. This was the largest gain since August 1991 (+6.0%). According to Statistics Canada, price rises were broad-based, with groceries up 7.4% year over year, gasoline up 32.2%, and shelter costs up 6.6%. Excluding gasoline, the CPI rose 4.7% year over year in February. The Bank of Canada's preferred measures of core inflation (which use techniques to strip out volatile elements) rose an average of 3.5% year-over-year in February. In BC, consumer prices rose 4.7% year-over-year in February. 

Tightening monetary policy by the Bank of Canada should slow demand and help to bring inflation down, though that will take time and rising oil and commodity prices caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine presents a risk of high inflation persisting longer than expected. Volatility in global financial markets briefly interrupted the upward march of long-term interest rates, however bond markets are once again pricing in an aggressively inflation-fighting Bank of Canada. We expect the Bank will increase its overnight rate five more times over the next year, bringing its key policy rate to 1.75 per cent before pausing to assess the impact of higher interest rates on the economy.


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Canadian housing starts rose by 18.1k (7.9%) to 247.3k units in February at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate (SAAR). Comparing year-over-year, starts were down from February of 2021 (7.4% y/y). Single-detached housing starts were largely unchanged from January at 78.1k, while multi-family and others rose 12% to 169.2k (SAAR). 

In British Columbia, starts were down 10.1% in February, falling to 35.5k units SAAR in all areas of the province. In areas in the province with 10,000 or more residents, single-detached starts rose 3.1% m/m to 7.4k units while multi-family starts declined 15.1% to 23.9k units. Starts in the province were 21.9% below the levels from February 2021. Starts were down by 5.1k units in Vancouver, 0.5k in Kelowna, and 0.6k in Abbotsford, but rose 1.5k in Victoria from last month. The 6-month moving average trend declined 4.5% to 40.4k in BC in February. 



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The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 8,902 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in February 2022, a decrease of 18.8 per cent from February 2021. The average MLS® residential price in BC was $1.109 million, a 24.9 per cent increase from $887,866 recorded in February 2021. Total sales dollar volume was $9.9 billion, a 1.5 per cent increase from the same time last year. 


“While sales are not keeping pace with the unprecedented level of activity we saw this time last year, demand continues to be quite strong,” said BCREA Chief Economist Brendon Ogmundson. “There are some encouraging signs that listings are recovering from historical lows, but there is a very long way to go before markets achieve balance.”
 
Provincial active listings were 19 per cent lower than this time last year with the total inventory of homes for sale in the province at just 16,000 units. That level of inventory is well below the roughly 40,000 listings needed for a balanced market.  



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Canadian employment rose by 337,000 (+1.8%) in February more than reversing a 200,000 decline in January driven by Omicron-related public health measures, according to Statistics Canada. The labour market is increasingly tight, with the Canadian unemployment rate declining to 5.5%, a level lower than prior to the pandemic in February 2020 (5.7%) for the first time. The total hours worked (+3.6%) as well as the employment rate (+1.0%) also rose strongly. 

As public health measures were partly lifted by the survey reference week in February, gains were concentrated in the Accommodation and Food Services (+114,000; +12.6%), and Information, Culture and Recreation (+73,000; +9.9%) sectors. Private sector employment rose by 2.8% to 347,000. On a year-over-year basis, wages were up 3.1%. The number of long-term unemployed Canadians fell by 51,000 (-19.4%) in February. 

In BC, employment rose more modestly than the rest of Canada (+21,000; 0.8%), but growth is very strong given that the province suffered no employment decline in January. Employment growth in February was concentrated in the Vancouver CMA (+18,000). Seasonally-adjusted employment in BC is not only above pre-pandemic levels, but hit a record high for a 5th consecutive month. The unemployment rate continued declining in BC, reaching 4.9%, the lowest rate since January 2020. Among the provinces, only Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba have lower unemployment rates. 



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The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver* is currently $1,313,400. This represents a 4.6% increase from January 2022.


Specifically:

- The benchmark price for detached homes increased 4.7% from Jan 2022 and increasd 25% from Feb 2021.

- The benchmark price for townhouses increased 5.9% from Jan 2022 and increased 27.2% from Feb 2021.

- The benchmark price for apartment/condos increased 4.1% from Jan 2022 and increased 15.9% from Feb 2021.





Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.