Steve Flynn  RE/MAX Crest Realty- Burnaby 

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Please visit our Open House at 702 719 PRINCESS ST in New Westminster.
Open House on Sunday, August 7, 2022 1:00PM - 3:00PM
SPOTLESS and in excellent condition! This LARGE 1076 sq ft, 2 bed/2 bath, north-east corner unit in coveted STIRLING PLACE has lovely views & stays COOL in the summer. Open, efficient floor plan, w/many UPDATES incl: new laminate flooring & paint throughout, new S/S kitchen appliances, new screen doors & ceiling fans. Gas fireplace for cooler days & 2 BALCONIES . Well-managed building w/very proactive strata, 640k in CRF & new EV charging in parkade! Amenities incl: club room, gym, workshop, etc. CONVENIENT location in Uptown w/health services, schools, dining, shopping, banks, etc, all within 1-3 blocks. Directly across Royal City Centre Mall. Comes w/1 parking & 1 locker. No pets, no rentals allowed.
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The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver* is currently $1,207,400. This represents a 2.3% decrease from June 2022 and a 10.3% increase from July 2021.


Specifically:

- The benchmark price for detached homes decreased 2.8% from June 2022 and increased 11% from July 2021.

- The benchmark price for townhouses decreased 1.7% from June 2022 and increased 15.8% from July 2021.

- The benchmark price for apartment/condos decreased 1.5% from June 2022 and increased 11.4% from July 2021.



*Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.

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Metro Vancouver’s* housing market has entered a new cycle marked by quieter home buyer demand and a gradual rise in the supply of homes for sale:


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 1,887 in July 2022, a 43.3 per cent decrease from the 3,326 sales recorded in July 2021, and a 22.8 per cent decrease from the 2,444 homes sold in June 2022. 
Last month’s sales were 35.2 per cent below the 10-year July sales average.


“Home buyers are exercising more caution in today’s market in response to rising interest rates and inflationary concerns,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “This allowed the selection of homes for sale to increase and prices to edge down in the region over the last three months.”


There were 3,960 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in July 2022. This represents a 9.5 per cent decrease compared to the 4,377 homes listed in July 2021 and a 24.7 per cent decrease compared to June 2022 when 5,256 homes were listed. 
The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 10,288, a 4.4 per cent increase compared to July 2021 (9,850) and a 1.3 per cent decrease compared to June 2022 (10,425).


“After two years of market conditions that favoured home sellers, home buyers now have more selection to choose from and more time to make their decision,” John said. “In today’s changing housing market, both home buyers and sellers should invest the time to understand what these changes mean for their personal circumstances.”


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for July 2022 is 18.3 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 11.8 per cent for detached homes, 20 per cent for townhomes, and 24.5 per cent for apartments. 
Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,207,400. This represents a 10.3 per cent increase over July 2021 and a 2.3 per cent decrease compared to June 2022.


Sales of detached homes in July 2022 reached 523, a 50.2 per cent decrease from the 1,050 detached sales recorded in July 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,000,600. This represents an 11 per cent increase from July 2021 and a 2.8 per cent decrease compared to June 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,060 in July 2022, a 36.4 per cent decrease compared to the 1,666 sales in July 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $755,000. This represents an 11.4 per cent increase from July 2021 and a 1.5 per cent decrease compared to June 2022.


Attached home sales in July 2022 totalled 304, a 50.2 per cent decrease compared to the 610 sales in July 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,096,500. This represents a 15.8 per cent increase from July 2021 and a 1.7 per cent decrease compared to June 2022.



Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.



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Canadian GDP was essentially unchanged in May, with growth in services-producing industries (+0.4 per cent) offsetting declines in goods-producing industries (-1 per cent). GDP grew in 14 of 20 subsectors. Canadian real GDP is roughly 2.2 per cent above its pre-pandemic, February 2020 level. Preliminary estimates suggest that output in the Canadian economy grew 0.1 per cent in June.

Unlike the United States, which just experienced back to back quarters of negative GDP growth, the Canadian economy is on track to average a solid 3.5 per cent over the first half of 2022. However, the impact of a clearly slowing US economy and an aggressive Bank of Canada will likely start to slow growth toward the end of this year and into 2023. Indeed, bond markets are already beginning to price in the impact of slower growth (or even recession) with 5-year bond yields down more than 100bps in the last month. If that trend continues, 5-year fixed mortgage rates should follow, providing much needed relief to the housing market. With slower GDP growth, indications that inflation may be nearing its peak, and the fact that the bank's interest rate is now within its neutral range of 2-3 per cent, we expect the bank to begin slowing its pace of rate increases going forward.



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.

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I have listed a new property at 702 719 PRINCESS ST in New Westminster.
VACANT and in excellent condition! This LARGE 1076 sq ft, 2 bed/2 bath, north-east corner unit in coveted STIRLING PLACE has lovely views & stays COOL in the summer. Open, efficient floor plan, w/many UPDATES incl: new laminate flooring & paint throughout, new S/S kitchen appliances, new screen doors & ceiling fans. Gas fireplace for cooler days & 2 BALCONIES . Well-managed building w/very proactive strata, 640k in CRF & new EV charging in parkade! Amenities incl: club room, gym, workshop, etc. CONVENIENT location in Uptown w/health services, schools, dining, shopping, banks, etc, all within 1-3 blocks. Directly across Royal City Centre Mall. Comes w/1 parking & 1 locker. No pets, no rentals allowed. Easy to show. OPEN HOUSE: Sun. July 31, 1-4pm.
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Please visit our Open House at 702 719 PRINCESS ST in New Westminster.
Open House on Sunday, July 31, 2022 1:00PM - 4:00PM
VACANT and in excellent condition! This LARGE 1076 sq ft, 2 bed/2 bath, north-east corner unit in coveted STIRLING PLACE has lovely views & stays COOL in the summer. Open, efficient floor plan, w/many UPDATES incl: new laminate flooring & paint throughout, new S/S kitchen appliances, new screen doors & ceiling fans. Gas fireplace for cooler days & 2 BALCONIES . Well-managed building w/very proactive strata, 640k in CRF & new EV charging in parkade! Amenities incl: club room, gym, workshop, etc. CONVENIENT location in Uptown w/health services, schools, dining, shopping, banks, etc, all within 1-3 blocks. Directly across Royal City Centre Mall. Comes w/1 parking & 1 locker. No pets, no rentals allowed. Easy to show. OPEN HOUSE: Sun. July 31, 1-4pm.
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Canadian seasonally-adjusted retail sales increased 2.2 per cent in May, hitting $62.2 billion. Sales grew in 8 of 11 subsectors, but were led by higher sales at gasoline stations and motor vehicle and parts dealers (+9.2 and +3.3 per cent respectively). Core retail sales, which strips out gasoline and motor vehicle and parts dealers, increased 0.6 per cent in May. In volume terms, sales were up 0.4 per cent. 

In BC, seasonally-adjusted sales rose 1.3 per cent in May. Compared to the same month last year, retail sales were up 3 per cent in the province. In the Greater Vancouver region, sales rose 0.8 per cent month-over-month and were up 4.5 per cent year-over-year. 

In May, Canadian e-commerce sales rose 6.5 per cent to 3.5 billion, corresponding to 4.9 per cent of retail sales. This percentage remains elevated relative to pre-pandemic levels, but is lower than during core months of the pandemic in 2020 and 2021. 



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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Canadian prices, as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), rose 8.1 per cent on a year-over-year basis in June, up from 7.7 per cent last month. This was the fastest growth rate since January 1983. Excluding gasoline, the CPI rose 6.5 per cent year over year in June. Month-over-month, on a seasonally-adjusted basis, prices were up 0.6 per cent, down from 1.1 per cent last month. In BC, consumer prices rose 7.9 per cent year-over-year, down from 8.1 per cent last month. Average hourly wages grew 5.2 per cent year-over-year in June, indicating a decline in purchasing power. 

While June's CPI brought some encouraging early signs that inflation is peaking, we will need to see a sustained decline in the rate of inflation over the next several months to see any relief on mortgage rates. For now, markets are still expecting an aggressive Bank of Canada, singularly focused on bringing inflation back to its 2 per cent target.




Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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Canadian housing starts fell by 8.3k (3 per cent) to 273.8k units in June at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate (SAAR). Comparing year-over-year, starts were down from June of 2021 (1.6 per cent). Single-detached housing starts declined 3.9 per cent to 72.1k, while multi-family and others fell 2.6 per cent to 201.8k (SAAR). 

In British Columbia, starts rose 34.6 per cent in June, rising to 56.4k units SAAR in all areas of the province. In areas in the province with 10,000 or more residents, single-detached starts declined 10.3 per cent m/m to 6.9k units while multi-family starts rose 48.4 per cent to 46k units. Starts in the province were 15.3 per cent below the levels from June 2021. Starts were up by 7.9k units in Vancouver, 6.4k in Kelowna, and 1.0k in Abbotsford from last month, while declining by 1.3k in Victoria. The 6-month moving average trend rose 0.3 per cent to 43.1k in BC in June. 



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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The Bank of Canada surprised markets with a larger than expected full point increase in its overnight rate, bringing its key policy rate to 2.5 per cent.  In the statement accompanying the decision, the Bank noted that inflation is higher and more persistent than the Bank expected and will likely trend near 8 per cent through the summer before easing to 3 per cent by the end of 2023. Core inflation, which removes the more volatile components of the CPI, is rising at between 4 and 5 per cent, indicating broad price pressures throughout the economy. While the economy is experience strong growth this year, the impact of Bank of Canada rate tightening is likely to slow the economic growth from 3.5 per cent this year to just 1.75 per cent in 2023.

The overnight rate is now within the Bank's estimate of "neutral", or the level of its policy rate at which inflation should run at 2 per cent and the economy is operating at full-capacity. However, it is clear from the Bank's statement that it expects it will have to tighten rates above neutral to bring inflation, and expectations of inflation, back to its 2 per cent target level.  As of this morning, financial markets expect that the Bank of Canada will raise its overnight rate to above 3 per cent, and those expectations are currently embedded in 5-year fixed mortgage rates which have exceeded 5 per cent for the first time in over a decade. While there are encouraging, early signs that inflation is peaking, we will need to see a sustained decline in the rate of inflation over the next several months to see any relief on mortgage rates. 



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.

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The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 7,136 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in June 2022, a decrease of 35.7 per cent from June 2021. The average MLS® residential price in BC was $951,105, a 4.6 per cent increase from $909,657 recorded in June 2021. Total sales dollar volume was $6.8 billion, a 32.8 per cent decline from the same time last year. 


“While a still growing economy and robust population growth point to strong demand, it is increasingly difficult to satisfy that demand at current interest rates,” said BCREA Chief Economist. “As a result, sales activity across the province, but especially in more expensive markets, continues to slow.”


For the second straight month, year-over-year provincial active listings rose, with listing in June 16.4 per cent higher than this time last year. While active listings remain below what is typical for a balanced market, some markets and housing types have tipped into balanced or even buyers’ market territory as sharply higher mortgage rates push potential buyers to the sidelines.


Year-to-date, BC residential sales dollar volume was down 17 per cent to $53.5 billion compared with the same period in 2021. Residential unit sales were down 27.6 per cent to 51,202 units, while the average MLS® residential price was up 14 per cent to $1.05 million.



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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Canadian employment declined by 43,000 (-0.2 per cent) to 19.597 million in June, falling for the first time since January. As a result of fewer people looking for work, the Canadian unemployment rate also declined by 0.2 to 4.9 per cent, the lowest rate on record for a fourth consecutive month. Average hourly wages were up 5.2 per cent on a year-over-year basis, increasing from 3.9 per cent in May and 3.3 per cent in April. Wage gains remain below the inflation rate, however, which hit 7.7 per cent year-over-year in the most-recent data. Total hours worked rose 1.3 per cent in June, the first increase since March 2022.

Employment in BC grew by 6.1k to 2.747 million in June, while Metro Vancouver's employment fell by 6.5k month over month. The unemployment rate rose slightly in June to 4.6 per cent. Among the provinces, only Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Quebec currently have lower unemployment rates. 



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver* is currently $1,235,900. This represents a 2.0% decrease from May 2022 and a 12.4% increase from June 2021.


Specifically:

- The benchmark price for detached homes decreased 1.7% from May 2022 and increased 13.4% from June 2021.

- The benchmark price for townhouses decreased 2.2% from May 2022 and increased 17.8% from June 2021.

- The benchmark price for apartment/condos decreased 1.7% from May 2022 and increased 12.7% from June 2021.



*Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.


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With interest rates and housing supply increasing, Metro Vancouver* home buyers are operating in a changing marketplace to begin the summer season. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,444 in June 2022, a 35 per cent decrease from the 3,762 sales recorded in June 2021, and a 16.2 per cent decrease from the 2,918 homes sold in May 2022. 
Last month’s sales were 23.3 per cent below the 10-year June sales average.

 
“Home buyers have more selection to choose from and more time to make decisions than they did over the past year,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “Rising interest rates and inflationary concerns are making buyers more cautious in today’s housing market, which is allowing listings to accumulate.” 


There were 5,256 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in June 2022. This represents a 10.1 per cent decrease compared to the 5,849 homes listed in June 2021 and a 17.6 per cent decrease compared to May 2022 when 6,377 homes were listed. 


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 10,425, a 3.8 per cent decrease compared to June 2021 (10,839) and a 4.1 per cent increase compared to May 2022 (10,010). 
“We’re seeing downward pressure on home prices as we enter summer in Metro Vancouver due to declining home buyer activity, not increased supply,” John said. “To meet Metro Vancouver’s long-term housing demands, we still need to significantly increase housing supply.”


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for June 2022 is 23.4 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 14.3 per cent for detached homes, 31.5 per cent for townhomes, and 30.2 per cent for apartments. 
Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,235,900. This represents a 12.4 per cent increase over June 2021, a two per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 2.2 per cent decrease over the past three months. 


Sales of detached homes in June 2022 reached 653, a 48.3 per cent decrease from the 1,262 detached sales recorded in June 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,058,600. This represents a 13.4 per cent increase from June 2021, a 1.7 per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 1.8 per cent decrease over the past three months. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,326 in June 2022, a 25.3 per cent decrease compared to the 1,774 sales in June 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $766,300. This represents a 12.7 per cent increase from June 2021, a 1.7 per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 0.8 per cent decrease over the past three months. 


Attached home sales in June 2022 totalled 465, a 36 per cent decrease compared to the 726 sales in June 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,115,600. This represents a 17.8 per cent increase from June 2021, a 2.2 per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 2.7 per cent decrease over the past three months.



Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.






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Canadian GDP rose 0.3 per cent in April, led by growth in the mining, quarrying, and oil and gas sector. Goods-producing sectors rose 0.9 per cent while services-producing industries were up 0.1 per cent. Canadian real GDP is roughly 2.2 per cent above its pre-pandemic, February 2020 level. Preliminary estimates suggest that output in the Canadian economy shrank 0.2 per cent in May.

The Canadian economy continues to post relatively strong GDP growth numbers, although preliminary estimates are for a small contraction in May. The Bank of Canada has noted that the slack in the Canadian economy is absorbed, which is partly why it has hiked rates from 0.25 in March to 1.5 per cent currently. Amid continuing GDP growth and high inflation, the expectation is that the bank will again raise rates at its upcoming July 13th announcement by an outsized 0.75 per cent, following the US Fed. Our view is that the bank will continue quarterly rate hikes until the overnight policy rate reaches 2 to 3 per cent, roughly in line with the estimate of the neutral rate of interest. 



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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Canadian prices, as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), rose 7.7 per cent on a year-over-year basis in May, up from 6.8 per cent last month. This was the fastest growth rate since January 1983. According to Statistics Canada, price rises were broad-based, with groceries up 9.7 per cent year-over-year, gasoline up 48 per cent, and shelter costs up 7.4 per cent. Excluding gasoline, the CPI rose 6.3 per cent year over year in May. Month-over-month, on a seasonally-adjusted basis, prices were up 1.1 per cent, the fastest pace since the introduction of the series in 1992. In BC, consumer prices rose 8.1 per cent year-over-year. Average hourly wages grew 3.9 per cent year-over-year in May, indicating a decline in purchasing power. 

A steep trajectory for the overnight rate implies that the 5-year fixed mortgage rate could reach the 5 per cent level for the first time since 2009 while variable mortgage rates may rise to as high as 4.5 per cent. With the stress test for both insured and uninsured borrowers, prospective homebuyers are currently being qualified at a rate of 6.49 per cent with a strong possibility of qualifying at 7 per cent soon, a rate that has not been a reality in the Canadian mortgage market since the early 2000s.

Given how aggressive markets expect the Bank of Canada to be, any good news on inflation, or any significant deterioration in the Canadian economy, could see a significant reversal in the most recent jump in Canadian bond yields. However, the baseline case for now is a Bank of Canada that is single-minded in its pursuit of lower inflation.


Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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Vancouver, BC – June 17, 2022.


The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 8,214 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in May 2022, a decrease of 35.1 per cent from May 2021. The average MLS® residential price in BC was $1 million, a 9.3 per cent increase from $915,392 recorded in May 2021. Total sales dollar volume was $8.2 billion, a 29.1 per cent decline from the same time last year. 


“Canadian mortgage rates continue to climb,” said BCREA Chief Economist Brendon Ogmundson. “The average 5-year fixed mortgage rate reached 4.49 per cent in June. That is the highest mortgage rates have been since 2009.”


Provincial active listings were 4.4 per cent higher than this time last year, the first year-over-year increase in active listings since 2019. However, active listings still remain below what is typical for a balanced market, though current market conditions have a high degree of variation across regions and product types.


Year-to-date, BC residential sales dollar volume was down 14.5 per cent to $46.7 billion, compared with the same period in 2021. Residential unit sales were down 26.3 per cent to 43,921 units, while the average MLS® residential price was up 16 per cent to $1.06 million.



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.


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Canadian employment edged up by 39,800 to 19.64 million in May. The labour market continued to tighten, with the Canadian unemployment rate declining by 0.1 to 5.1 per cent, the lowest rate on record for a second consecutive month. Average hourly wages were up 3.9 per cent on a year-over-year basis, increasing from April's 3.3 per cent. Wage gains are below the inflation rate, however, which hit 6.8 per cent year-over-year in the most-recent data. The employment rate held steady at 61.9 per cent.

Employment in BC grew by 5.1k to 2.74 million in May. Metro Vancouver's employment grew by 7.1k (0.5 per cent) month over month. The unemployment rate declined sharply in May to 4.5 per cent, approaching record lows set in the mid 2000s. Of the provinces, only Quebec currently has a lower unemployment rate. 



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The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver* is currently $1,370,377. This represents a 0.3% decrease from Apr 2022 and a 14.7% increase from May 2021.


Specifically:

- The benchmark price for detached homes decreased 0.4% from Apr 2022 and increased 15% from May 2021.

- The benchmark price for townhouses decreased 0.6% from Apr 2022 and increased 21.5% from May 2021.

- The benchmark price for apartment/condos increased 0.4% from Apr 2022 and increased 15% from May 2021.



Areas covered by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver include: Burnaby, Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, South Delta, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Whistler.



Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission

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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.